REVIEW: APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic

Hello everyone!

With only one week to go before we exit the Circuit Breaker, professionals including myself, who have to commute to our workplaces come 2 June, would have started mentally preparing for the unprecedented changes in our weekday morning routines. For beautyholics like me, the mandatory wearing of face mask will mean ditching the lipstick and placing more emphasis on the eyes – but there’s a problem. Nearly two months of going bare faced has likely rendered my eyeshadow application skills slightly rusty, and as vain as it sounds, I certainly do not want to risk being late to work just to redo my makeup!

Scouring the virtual beauty aisle on Shopee (really the ultimate lockdown boredom saviour 🙌🏻 *cues heavenly choir sound effect*) during one of its flash sales had thankfully pointed me to a possible solution – the Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow by APRILSKIN. This compact eyeshadow palette is marketed as a timesaver as it enables the user to blend three (shimmery) shades at once.

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, front)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, front)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, back)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, back)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, side)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box, side)

Such concept of having multiple colours in one pan isn’t new since Benefit CosmeticsLaneige (albeit theirs is in the form of bullets) and many other Korean beauty brands were already ahead of the game. But as far as I can remember, no other reputable beauty brand has come close to offering two 3-in-1 colour combinations for under S$30 ($27 on Guardian and $24.30 on Shopee, or S$18.70 in my case). In fact, at 6 grams of product per palette (case in point: They’re Real! Duo Eyeshadow Blender contains 3.5 grams of product while Two Tone Shadow Bar only has 2 grams, and both cost a lot more!), this already is a clear winner in the price department.

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box and case)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box and case)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box and case, back)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (box and case, back)

Stowed in a tight-fitting box, the rectangular packaging resembles an enlarged version of a mint candy tin box. It is about the size of my palm, small and slim enough to slide into my purse and carry on the go. The inside cover of the lid is reflective (even with its protective film stuck on) so it acts as a mirror.

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product with plastic film)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product with plastic film)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product with plastic film)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product with plastic film)

Applicator

Applicator

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product without plastic film)

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow in Pure & Chic (product without plastic film)

Size of applicator

Size of applicator

Boink boink!

Boink boink!

The eyeshadow pans, each measuring roughly 4 cm by 2 cm, are aligned vertically and enclosed in a plastic film to prevent them from staining the box. Right next to them lies the sponge-tip applicator which is highly encouraged to be used (much to my reluctance) for the product to bring about the desired results. The tip of the applicator is dome-shaped which doesn’t extend over the full width of the pan so unless you place it strategically, you won’t be able to pick up all three shades simultaneously.

The topmost colour combination is named “Pure” and it consists of everyday neutral shades including a champagne (for highlights), a beige with red undertones and a medium brown. The payoff was mostly sheer when swatched with the applicator. The lightest shade almost couldn’t be seen, and I had to press down and drag the applicator across my skin for some degree of pigmentation to be visible. However, applying with my finger gave more payoff (which is somewhat expected of shimmery shades) and the gradient also appeared more vivid and seamless.

Actual distribution of "Pure" in the pan (genuinely curious: what is the rationale for giving the lightest shade the biggest area?)

Actual distribution of “Pure” in the pan (genuinely curious: what is the rationale for giving the lightest shade the biggest area?)

"Pure" - swatched with finger (2-3 swipes)

“Pure” – swatched with finger (2-3 swipes)

How you should position your applicator on the pan to pick up all three shades at once

How you should position your applicator on the pan to pick up all three shades at once

Distribution of product on the applicator

Distribution of product on the applicator

"Pure" - swatched with the applicator

“Pure” – swatched with the applicator

How "Pure" looks on my primed lid (pardon my bare face as I didn't see the point in dolling up if I ain't going anywhere fancy)

How “Pure” looks on my primed lid (pardon my bare face as I was too lazy to put on makeup didn’t see the point in dolling up if I ain’t going anywhere fancy)

The colour combination “Chic” below would be more suited for a glammed-up look (but still appropriate for everyday wear) as it has a peachy beige (for highlights), a reddish plum and a deeper brown. As a whole, this is slightly more pigmented than Pure (still sheer in my book) and is also best applied with finger. However, the darkest shade did not seem to deliver much payoff – I had to run the applicator over my lids a few times before a faint brown emerged.

Actual distribution of "Chic" in the pan

Actual distribution of “Chic” in the pan

"Chic" - swatched with finger (2-3 swipes)

“Chic” – swatched with finger (2-3 swipes)

Distribution of product on the applicator

Distribution of product on the applicator

"Chic" - swatched with the applicator

“Chic” – swatched with the applicator

How "Chic" looks on my primed lid

How “Chic” looks on my primed lid

I wore both shades concurrently for 8 hours (I took the chance to wear them out to run some errands and was pretty sure I attracted bemused stares), and I must say both contributed a fair bit of fallout – some of which were shimmers – on my face. Surprisingly, despite having oily lids, the eyeshadows did not smear or wedge into my creases over time (Laneige’s Two Tone Shadow Bar is the biggest culprit when it comes to this – what terrible product 😤) and actually stayed on throughout the duration of my wear test!

"Pure" and "Chic" - side-by-side comparison

“Pure” and “Chic” – side-by-side comparison

Swatch comparison (in terms of payoff) with Japanese (shu uemura) and American (ColourPop) eyeshadows

Swatch comparison (in terms of payoff) with Japanese (shu uemura) and American (ColourPop) eyeshadows

The downside of this product is its generally sheer wash of colour (typical of Asian makeup products and it is nice if you want a more natural-looking finish to brighten up your peepers) but to be fair, it still gave way better payoff than many Korean eyeshadows I have tried. Getting the placement of the eyeshadow on the lids right with the applicator would require some trial and error, so you’re better off using your fingers or a wide dense eyeshadow brush if time is of the essence. Furthermore, it would also be a pain to wash the applicator without further spreading the shimmers all over the surface of the tip.

However, I must say that the impressive longevity came as a pleasant surprise! This makeup concept, although questionable at first, has also won me over as I like how it would be able to streamline my makeup routine and allow me to get to the door quicker once in-office work is resumed 😊

What are your thoughts on this makeup concept? Let me know what you think in the comments below or take a quick poll!

Thanks for reading!

APRILSKIN Perfect Magic Dual Eyeshadow is now available on Shopee and GUARDIAN SINGAPORE.

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REVIEW: Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette

Hello everyone!

The credibility of Kat Von D might have taken a hit for her stance on vaccinations, but we cannot deny that her makeup brand is still one of the most successful in the industry after many years into the beauty business, owing to the high-performance and cruelty-free products in wildly unorthodox colours that it has been producing.

To celebrate a decade of fearless artistry, Kat Von D Beauty dropped a 10th Anniversary collection and in honour of her Latinx heritage, the launch was planned to coincide with Cinco de Mayo (5 May), a culturally and historically significant day for the Mexicans. The line includes an eyeshadow palette, a Metal Crush Highlighter (Gold Skool), Studded Creme Kiss Lipstick (Santa Sangre), an Everlasting Glimmer Veil Liquid Lipstick (Gold Skool), a brush set, Tattoo Liner (Trooper) and a train case comprising everything in this gold-drenched lineup – but in very limited quantity. My eyes were set on the eyeshadow palette (though now I kinda regret not buying the gold liquid lipstick as well).. because nobody can get enough of rainbow beauty things, right?

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette (US$52 / S$76)

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette (US$52 / S$76)

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette [I got mine off the KVD website]

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette [I got mine off the KVD website]

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette

Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette

Finger and brush swatches of all shades (Click to view full size)

Finger and brush swatches of all shades (Click to view full size)

Encased in a reflective gold packaging graced by an original artwork hand-drawn by the talented Kat Von D herself, the limited-edition eyeshadow palette features 16 blendable shades (mostly of warm hues) inspired by and named after 16 of Kat Von D’s muses – people of all backgrounds, ages, genders and skin tones, some of whom had worked behind the scenes.

The bold selection of shades were specially handpicked for this commemorative collection, are vegan (as always) and of finishes designed to “power your self-expression with insane pigment and effortless blendability”. What I love about the palette (apart from the fact that it comes with a mirror) is that the shades are arranged almost in sequence as in the colour spectrum, and this spoke to the OCD in me. But annoyingly, their names are not printed on the palette so I had to keep referring to the box for them.

The following palettes were selected for comparison purposes due to their similarities to Kat Von D 10-Year Anniversary: ColourPop × Shayla Perception · Kat Von D Saint and Sinner. The comparison swatches shown below are the same as those on my Perception review.

Adele is described as a chocolate brown. This deep cocoa brown has a matte finish with very sparse and unnoticeable gold shimmer. Smooth to the touch, there was amazingly no kickback when I dipped my finger or brush into the pan (which is rare for dark shades). The application was slightly sheer and streaky but was buildable to a semi-opaque coverage. When blended out, however, some of the product wouldn’t budge while those that did balled up slightly. On top of that, the overall intensity was also reduced. In its wet state, it becomes a hard film that is nearly impossible to blend. For comparison swatches, please refer to the image after the review on Malice.

Malice is described as a vermilion red. This burnt orange has red undertones and a matte finish which feels a little powdery. There was a bit of kickback in the pan when I picked it up with my brush, but it didn’t have any fallout when I applied it to my lid. This shade provided an even consistency and was easy to blend without sheering out too much so it didn’t take me long to build it to full opacity. It delivers almost the same, if not a slightly more intense payoff when used wet.

Swatch comparison for Malice and Adele

Swatch comparison for Malice and Adele

Ashley is a described as a peachy orange. This bright orange has yellow undertones and a matte finish. Finely milled to a powdery smooth texture, it goes on pigmented on bare skin without being chalky. The harsh edges can also be diffused easily without becoming muddy or sheering away. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Nancy.

Gina is described as a mustard yellow. This matte warm yellow has orange undertones and it becomes darker (almost leaning towards orange) when more product is piled on. Finely milled with a smooth texture, this shade adheres well to the skin while providing great pigmentation. I had no issues diffusing the harsh edges when applied wet or dry. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Nancy.

Egypt is described as a gold glimmer. Infused with glitzy chunky shimmer that appears loosely scattered when applied, this muted warm gold does not feel as gritty as it seems in the pan. It goes on very smooth and pigmented on bare skin skin, delivering an opaque payoff without the need for a primer. When I blended out the colour, it didn’t sheer out or lose much of its sparkle. When used wet, the shimmer becomes more condense, enabling the shine to be a lot more pronounced. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Alexandra.

Sylvia is described as a honey beige. This pale warm beige has orange undertones and a matte finish. The payoff is mostly sheer, and in order to achieve some opacity, a lot of product have to be patted on. Like most of the shades in this palette, it has a smooth consistency which blends out seamlessly. Unfortunately, the colour is matches my skin tone too well to make any impact so I don’t see myself using it often. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Nancy.

Lala is described as an olive green. This deep moss green has yellow undertones and a semi-opaque matte finish, and is a splendid addition to my limited repertoire of green eyeshadows. But as much as I adore this shade for its uniqueness, it sadly does not perform up to my expectations. Besides having a lightly chalky consistency, it also tends to emphasise the texture of my skin and ball up when I tried to blend it out, resulting in a patchy and distressed-like texture. These issues, however, seem to minimised when product is used wet. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Carolyn.

Leafar is described as an emerald glimmer. This cool vibrant green has blue undertones and a metallic finish owing to its densely packed fine shimmer. Although pressed relatively loosely in the pan (as I could feel the product lifting off when I swirled my finger in the pan), the amount of kickback is pretty minimal. Smooth in texture, this shade adheres well to bare skin and blends out easily without affecting its intensity. It goes on semi-sheer on first pass but once more product is piled on, its opacity and vibrancy are out of this world. Leafar works beautifully dry and wet. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Carolyn.

Melanie is described as a rosy cream. Matte in finish, this pale cool beige is probably one tone away from being completely white – it is so light that it disappeared the instant I swatched it on the paler part of my wrist. This shade is mostly opaque, and it applies fairly pigmented without any fallout. I was also able to diffuse the edges easily.

Swatch comparison for Melanie and Alexandra

Swatch comparison for Melanie and Alexandra

Alexandra is described as a rose gold glimmer but it appears more of an iridescent orange with yellow undertones and a slight pink shift to me. This shade is the shimmery and slightly darker version of Gina although it appears more peachy in the pan. Very finely milled with a smooth and seamless consistency, this shade goes on opaque and blends out effortlessly without losing much intensity. Furthermore, a little of this product goes a long way – it delivers incredible payoff without having to jab your brush into the pan.

Swatch comparison for Egypt and Alexandra

Swatch comparison for Egypt and Alexandra

Nancy is described as a taupe mauve. This muted terracotta has brown undertones and a matte finish. Finely milled to a smooth, even and endearing texture, this shade applies mostly opaque on the lid and is fairly easy to diffuse. There was some kickback in the pan, but negligible enough not to cause any mess. It does, however, tend to become increasingly greyish when more product is added atop each layer.

Swatch comparison for Ashley, Gina, Sylvia and Nancy

Swatch comparison for Ashley, Gina, Sylvia and Nancy

Catherine² is described as an orchid glimmer. This mid-tone lavender has pink undertones and loose shimmer which renders it a metallic finish. At certain angles, however, it appears eggplant purple with a hint of grey. This shade applies sheer and requires many layers before it stops allowing my natural skin to show through anymore. Additionally, it does not spread out very well as the product tends to concentrate at the part where the brush touches first and it didn’t budge an inch when I tried to blend it out.

Swatch comparison for Catherine²

Swatch comparison for Catherine²

Kelly is described as a blue-brow glimmer. This warm brown has loosely scattered cyan shimmer and a duochrome finish to boot. The shift on my finger after I dipped it into the pan looked seamlessly stunning but it didn’t quite translate well on my lid – the shimmer was seemed like it was on a separate layer from the main product and the sparkle was too ostentatious for the shift to be noticeable. Packing on more product made them more cohesive until I blended it out (as the shimmer along the edges once again distanced itself from the brown). Eventually, the problem was resolved by applying the product with a dampened brush. Not only did that keep the shimmer and the brown together, it also intensified the shine. For comparison swatches, please scroll down to the review on Carolyn.

Sarah is described as a cool greige (a mix of grey and beige). This cool mauve has grey undertones and it applies sheer and streaky. The product clings on uneven surfaces and is barely buildable. But once it is blended out, it fades to nothingness. You might think that this could probably work better when used wet. WRONG! It hardened and darkened to a dirty purple when I applied it with a dampened brush and it was a Herculean task to diffuse it at all. How did this horrible shade make it into the palette?

Swatch comparison for Sarah

Swatch comparison for Sarah

Carolyn is described as a muted teal but, I don’t know if it is just me but it seems a little too dark to be qualified as “muted”? This matte shade has a strong blue undertone and looked promisingly opaque on the first pass. But that excitement quickly turned to disappointment when the product started losing its intensity and sheering out (except for that little area where the brush first touched) upon being diffused. Apart from that, this shade also has a mild rubbery and stiff texture with an uneven consistency which caused it to ball up when I ran my brush through it on my lid.

Swatch comparison for Lala, Leafar, Kelly and Carolyn

Swatch comparison for Lala, Leafar, Kelly and Carolyn

Chad is described as a cobalt teal. This vivid cobalt blue has a matte finish and possibly nanoscopic gold flecks as well (but I wasn’t sure if they were originally there or were transferred from the one of the shimmery shades my finger had touched previously). It has a consistency similar to that of Carolyn – uneven and patchy with the tendency to cling onto rough surfaces. The harsh edges were also a challenge to diffuse because the product just refused to budge. This shade left a stain that took me a few scrubs to remove completely, so use sparingly if you can!

Swatch comparison for Carolyn and Chad

Swatch comparison for Carolyn and Chad

APPLICATION & SUGGESTED LOOK

In the suggested look below, I will be attempting to apply every single shade in the palette onto my lids.

My made-up face, sans eye shadow (I know I had gone a little overboard with the bronzer here lol)

My made-up face, sans eye shadow (I know I had gone a little overboard with the bronzer here lol)

Malice

Malice

Malice

Malice

Ashley

Ashley

Ashley

Ashley

Nancy

Nancy

Nancy

Nancy

Sylvia

Sylvia

Sylvia

Sylvia

Adele

Adele

Adele

Adele

Egypt

Egypt

Egypt

Egypt

Coating my upper lid with concealer

Coating my upper lid with concealer

Alexandra

Alexandra

Alexandra (on top of the concealer)

Alexandra (on top of the concealer)

Catherine²

Catherine²

Catherine²

Catherine²

Kelly

Kelly

Kelly

Kelly

Chad

Chad

Chad

Chad

Carolyn

Carolyn

Carolyn

Carolyn

Leafar

Leafar

Leafar

Leafar

Lala

Lala

Lala

Lala

Sarah

Sarah

Sarah

Sarah

Melanie

Melanie

Melanie (disappearing into my skin)

Melanie (disappearing into my skin)

Melanie

Melanie

Without eye shadow → with eye shadow, eyeliner and mascara

Without eye shadow → with eye shadow, eyeliner and mascara

Based on what I have gathered, it is safe to say that the warms are the stars of the palette. They deliver intense colours and are easy to blend. That said, I find the orange hues a bit repetitive. The cools, although provided additional visual interest with shades like Lala and Carolyn, have been lacklustre due to their patchy consistency and poor blendability. But in general, this palette is still relatively easier to work with as compared to those I have tried by other brands because the shades don’t need to be damp for them to show on my lids – they are already pretty pigmented on their own!

What do you think about this palette? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below or simply take a quick poll!

Thanks for reading!

Kat Von D 10th Anniversary Eyeshadow Palette is now available on Kat Von D (sold out), Sephora USA (sold out) and Sephora Singapore.

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REVIEW: M·A·C × Rossy de Palma Veluxe Pearlfusion Shadow, Lipsticks in Rossy & Phenomenal Woman

Hello everyone!

Before the Snow Ball collection took center stage with it stunning marketing visuals, there was another contender that had attracted a great deal of attention for its equally innovative packaging design.

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma for Fall 2017

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma for Fall 2017

Born Rosa Elena García Echave in Spain, Rossy de Palma is a former fashion model, an actress and a charity spokesperson for the Ghanian Charity OrphanAid Africa which among other causes, advocates for the closure of illegal orphanages. Often dubbed a walking Picasso painting, de Palma doesn’t fit the stereotypical definition of a high-profile actress – she doesn’t have doe eyes, sharp nose nor a perfectly proportioned mouth. But it’s this extraordinary (like, literally!) look of hers that had earned her the right to walk the runways for Mugler, Gaultier, and Givenchy and become the face of luxury ad campaigns. What a role model she is!

In this day and age of nip and tuck where most people won’t even bat an eyelid to modify their appearance with cosmetic surgery (and end up looking like they were all stamped out of the same cookie cutter), her unique aesthetic comes across as striking yet authentic at the same time, like a breath of fresh air. In fact, don’t you think she looks like a Picasso-esque version of Lady Gaga?

The display (FYI the one with the nose image is the contour kit - kinda like that one too)

The display (FYI the one with the nose image is the contour kit – kinda like that one too)

My haul!

My haul!

And what better way to embrace your (im)perfections than partnering with M·A·C on a collection centered around them? This collection takes inspiration from Cubism – an early-20th-century art movement created by Picasso – with gold as the primary colour and Rossy’s artistic signature plastered on all the products. For a more Cubist approach, a lenticular image of her (zoomed in, no less) unconventional facial attributes are featured on the packaging of a selected range as seen in the promotional picture above. It may not be the intention, but I like how Rossy de Palma and M·A·C are delivering a subtle screw you to bigots who have criticised her looks with this collaboration.

“Hate my fractured nose and my asymmetrical eyelids, you say? Here’s every part of me you dislike on your makeup. HA, take that!”

All jokes aside, I don’t usually venture out into buying anything else apart from lipsticks from any M·A·C collection. But the packaging is just too brilliant to resist 😆

#1 Veluxe Pearlfusion Shadow

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow (US$32 / S$72)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow (US$32 / S$72)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow - the lenticular effect!

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow – the lenticular effect!

Other details

Other details

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow - the shades

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow – the shades

SWATCHES & REVIEW

Close-up of the 6 shades, all in pans of different sizes

Close-up of the 6 shades, all in pans of different sizes

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow swatches

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Veluxe Pearlfinish Shadow swatches

Pinky is described a bright pink with Veluxe Pearl finish. It is a warm-toned medium pink glistened with very fine fuchsia shimmers and is filled in the smallest pan of the palette (the same with Money) which can be a little hard for a fluffy brush to reach without touching the shade next to it.

Semi-opaque in coverage, this shade works great as a base colour. Probably due to its soft and smooth texture, it causes quite a bit of kick-up in the pan (chunks of product would come off) when picked up with a brush. Despite its flaky consistency (which is rather noticeable on the lid), it blends well on the lid without having much fallout and leaves an evenly silky finish. Also, it doesn’t have the tendency to stain like most pink eye shadows and can be easily removed.

Swatch comparison for Pinky

Swatch comparison for Pinky

Smokes is described as a soft lilac with Veluxe Pearl finish. It is a cool-toned purple with fine blue shimmers (albeit more subtle than the others). Powdery in texture, this shade applies unevenly on the lid with both dry and dampened brushes and has sheer colour payoff with very limited buildability. When blended out, it loses its intensity to the extent of almost fading to nothing. I had to use small patting and dabbing motions for the colour to show reasonably but it still creases and fades away the moment my lids show signs of oiliness. Therefore, I won’t recommend this to be used on its own as a single shade.

Swatch comparison for Smokes

Swatch comparison for Smokes

Charcoal is described as a black with multi-colour pearl. It has a Veluxe Pearl finish mostly made of white, sparsely-scattered, in-your-face sparkles with an overall chunkier texture and powdery consistency. When hit with a brush, it leaves a negligible amount of kickback in the pan. But when applied on the lid, some product came dusting off into my eyes. Although it has fairly good pigmentation with semi-sheer (but buildable) coverage on the lid, it does not blend very well, unfortunately.

Considering that this shade would most likely be the least used of all since it is less versatile and more difficult to work with, it is pure bewilderment that it is allotted the largest pan size on this palette. Makes me wonder what the thought process behind the apportion of the pan sizes to the shades is like 🤔

Deep which is described as a dark blackened navy with Veluxe Pearl finish. This captivating shimmery cool-toned deep blue is as close as it gets to a metallic blue because of the densely packed sparkles. Deep goes on semi-opaque when first applied but can be built on to achieve full coverage. It is fairly blendable with a cream-like texture, therefore making it a joy to work with. It is definitely one of the better performers in this palette with a payoff on par with or a tad better than Pinky which wore well on me.

Swatch comparison for Charcoal and Deep

Swatch comparison for Charcoal and Deep

In the bottommost pan on the palette is Money, a soft green with Veluxe Pearl finish as described by M·A·C. This turquoise with fine green shimmers has a flaky texture like Pinky which tends to ball up in the pan. When applied, it gives a sheer to semi-opaque coverage (don’t be deceived by the swatch – the pigment is nothing of the sort on my lid) that would take a few coats to build the colour intensity up. A point to note, though, is that Money is rather loosely pressed as compared to the rest of the shades. Hence, although digging the brush into the pan may be necessary to get a decent payoff on the lid, it is not advisable lest you break it apart.

Nevertheless, this shade is a disappointment. Not only is it flighty on my naturally oily lid, it creases even over primer. I also had some trouble blending and diffusing this shade because it budges with the slightest contact. Even if I managed to get it work on my lid, it is only fleetingly as it started to look splotchy after two hours of wear.

Swatch comparison for Money

Swatch comparison for Money

APPLICATION & SUGGESTED LOOK

The products I will be using

The products I will be using

Using Urban Decay Eyeshadow Primer Potion to prime the lids

Using Urban Decay Eyeshadow Primer Potion to prime the lids

Pinky as base colour

Pinky as base colour

Money to make the eyes pop

Money to make the eyes pop

Smokes as a transition colour

Smokes as a transition colour

Deep to add depth (no pun intended)

Deep to add depth (no pun intended)

Smokes again to define (you can clearly see the colour rubbing off here)

Smokes again to define (you can clearly see the colour rubbing off here)

Mirroring the colours on the lower lid

Mirroring the colours on the lower lid

Charcoal for even more depth

Charcoal for even more depth (actually, I just wanted to wear all the shades on my lids)

Mirroring, again..

Mirroring, again..

And again..

And again..

How the shades in the pan translate onto my lids

How the shades in the pan translate onto my lids

The final look!

The final look!

#2 Lipstick – Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick packaging

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick packaging

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy (US$17.50 / S$33)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy (US$17.50 / S$33)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Rossy

Rossy is described as a dirty mauve purple with Matte finish. Creamy in texture, this warm-toned purple glides on like butter and imparts a hint of lustre to keep the lips looking (and feeling) moisturised. The texture is slightly oily for a matte which makes it susceptible to transfer and shorter wear time. On top of that, I notice that this shade also tends to settle into my lip lines. It applies evenly and has pretty good pigmentation but requires several swipes to be reasonably opaque.

Swatch comparison for Rossy

Swatch comparison for Rossy

#3 Lipstick – Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman (US$17.50 / S$33)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman (US$17.50 / S$33)

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

M·A·C × Rossy De Palma Lipstick in Phenomenal Woman

Phenomenal Woman is an online-exclusive described as a dark plum with Matte finish and is the only lipstick in this collection to sell out online. This cool-toned burgundy has a richer sheen to it which is not something I would expect from a matte formula. In fact, I think it looks more satin than matte. This shade tugs and pulls lightly at the lips during application, giving a streaky and uneven payoff which is mostly caused by the product seeping into the lip lines and clinging onto the dry patches on the lips. It has a thin and tacky texture that is neither hydrating nor drying on me.

Swatch comparison for Phenomenal Woman

Swatch comparison for Phenomenal Woman

I must say that I’m pleasantly surprised that, despite the fanciful packaging and unchanged pricing, the quality in the products (maybe save that few shades in the eye shadow compact that didn’t apply very well. Shame!) did not really take a beating. Has M·A·C finally come to the realisation that in the eyes of consumers, quality is king? If that’s the case, I can’t wait to see what more M·A·C has to offer for the coming year!

What do you think about M·A·C × Rossy De Palma? Let me know your comments below or take a quick poll!

Thanks for reading!

M·A·C × Rossy de Palma is now available on MACCosmetics.com and in all local M.A.C outlets.

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